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2019 Medicaid Numbers

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has released the 2019 federal guidelines for how much money the spouses of institutionalized Medicaid recipients may keep, as well as related Medicaid figures.

In 2019, the spouse of a Medicaid recipient living in a nursing home (called the “community spouse”) may keep as much as $126,420 without jeopardizing the Medicaid eligibility of the spouse who is receiving long-term care. Called the “community spouse resource allowance,” this is the most that a state may allow a community spouse to retain without a hearing or a court order. While some states set a lower maximum, the least that a state may allow a community spouse to retain in 2019 will be $25,284.

Meanwhile, the maximum monthly maintenance needs allowance for 2019 will be $3,160.50. This is the most in monthly income that a community spouse is allowed to have if her own income is not enough to live on and she must take some or all of the institutionalized spouse’s income. The minimum monthly maintenance needs allowance for the lower 48 states remains $2,057.50 ($2,572.50 for Alaska and $2,366.25 for Hawaii) until July 1, 2019.

In determining how much income a particular community spouse is allowed to retain, states must abide by this upper and lower range. Bear in mind that these figures apply only if the community spouse needs to take income from the institutionalized spouse. According to Medicaid law, the community spouse may keep all her own income, even if it exceeds the maximum monthly maintenance needs allowance.

The new spousal impoverishment numbers (except for the minimum monthly maintenance needs allowance) take effect on January 1, 2019.

For a more complete explanation of the community spouse resource allowance and the monthly maintenance needs allowance, click here.

Home Equity Limits:

In 2019, a Medicaid applicant’s principal residence will not be counted as an asset by Medicaid unless the applicant’s equity interest in the home is less than $585,000, with the states having the option of raising this limit to $878,000.

For more on Medicaid’s home equity limit, click here.

Income Cap:

In order to qualify for Medicaid, a nursing home resident’s income must not be above a certain level. Most states allow individuals to spend down their excess income on their care until they reach the state’s income standard. But other states impose an “income cap,” which means no spend-down is allowed.

In 2019, the income cap in these states will be $2,313 a month.  Florida is an income cap state.  For those with income above that amount a qualified income trust can be created to qualify.  For more on the income cap, click here.

 

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